How to Pick a Domain Name that Stands for Your Brand

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By Mary Cooper

updated about 3 hours ago

Your domain name represents your firm on the Web. Selecting one is tantamount to choosing a name for your brand. And it doesn’t necessarily have to match your company’s name. Use these simple hacks for coming up with an effective domain name that best represents you.

One of the bonuses of choosing a TaxDome URL is that whatever you’d like to use is most likely available. Some .com addresses can sell for tens of millions of dollars—a TaxDome URL is free. Your subdomain can be anything as long as it’s at least two letters. 


Keep it short and pithy. A short domain name is easier to type and remember. Start with your full company name, then try to shorten it by using an abbreviation, acronym, or less words. For example, an accounting firm named Bob Jones, Mary Smith CPAs could use bobjonesmarysmithcpas.taxdome.com but would probably be better off with the less complicated and more succinct option bjms.taxdome.com.


Make it easy to type. A good domain name is one that is easy to find and promote. Avoid using numbers, hyphens, slang, or words that have more than one spelling or are difficult to spell. 


Use a keyword. It may be to your advantage to use a keyword someone would enter in a Google search while looking for the type of services your company offers. Instead of using your firm’s actual name, you have that option. Say, if you’re doing taxes for small businesses, you could go with smallbusinesstax.taxdome.com.


Include your location. If you are aiming to grow a local clientele, you may want to add your city or state to your domain name. For instance, if you’re based in L.A., you could use latax.taxdome.com or calitax.taxdome.com.


Select an appropriate domain name extension. When choosing your firm’s TaxDome URL, you won’t need to worry about the domain name extension. However, if you want to run your site on a custom domain that links to your firm’s TaxDome account, you will have to choose an extension. An extension is a suffix, such as .com or .org, placed at the end of a Web address. Although many would recommend getting a .com, the most popular top-level domain (TLD), it isn’t always optimal. For example, if your business is entirely local, you could use a geographic domain extension, such as .nyc or .boston. Or you could select a new TLD that reflects your type of service, such as .accountant, .consulting, or .tax. Since these TLDs started  only a couple of years ago, short and easy-to-remember ones are still available. So you might want to grab one while they still offer more freedom of choice for your domain name.  

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